Weekly Brazos River Outlook

The Brazos River in Richmond is currently at Gage Elevation 16.57 and rising from the rainfall the watershed received over the past 48 to 72 hours. The WGRFC predicts that the Brazos River through Richmond will peak below Action Stage over the next week. Based on the 7-day extended forecast, no flooding along the Brazos River through Fort Bend County is anticipated.

 

Memorial Weekend Recap

The past 72 hours has been active across portions of the State; however, actual rainfall amounts were slightly below the forecast for the majority of the Brazos River Watershed. Overall, the majority of the Brazos River Watershed received between 0.5 to 1.5 inches of rain with peak amounts closer to 3 to 4 inches over the past 72 hours. The peak rainfall amounts occurred a portion of Austin County near Bellville and a portion of the Navasota River watershed. This system has caused rises on the Brazos River to occur from Waco to Freeport, but all gages have peaked or are currently predicted to peak in or below Action Stage.

This Week

This week should consist of sunny to partly cloudy skies with highs in the upper 80s and lows in upper 60s. Our rain chances remain low over the next 7 days except for Thursday when a round of scattered showers and thunderstorms could work their way through the Region. The NWS 7-Day Quantitative Precipitation Forecast (QPF) shows the majority of the Brazos River Watershed receiving less than ½ inch over the next 7 days with a potential peak of 1 to 1.5 inches upstream of Bryan/College Station.

Reservoir Status

Weekly Brazos River Outlook

The Brazos River in Richmond is currently at Gage Elevation 12.95 and rising from our Friday and Saturday storms. The WGRFC predicts that the Brazos River through Richmond will peak around Gage Elevation 17.4 feet on Friday. Based on the 7-day extended forecast, no flooding along the Brazos River through Fort Bend County is anticipated.

Weekend Rain Recap

The weekend storms brought heavy rainfall across the region with the heaviest amounts falling south of I-10. 4 to 6 inches within 2 to 3 hours fell over parts of Sugar Land and Missouri City causing street ponding and rapid raises in several streams. Over the two days, northeastern Fort Bend County received 6 to 7 inches with the remainder of Fort Bend County receiving between 1 to 3 inches. The Brazos River Watershed upstream of Fort Bend County received less than 1.5 inches over the past 72 hours. This rainfall is causing minor flood conditions on parts of the Navasota River; however, the Brazos River should stay below Action Stage from Bryan/College Station to Freeport. Through Fort Bend County, the forecasted peak is near our historical averages for the Month of May.

This Week

Most of this week should consist of sunny to partly cloudy skies with highs in the low to mid-90s and lows in the low to mid-70s. In addition to the warmer weather, our rain chances through Friday remain low. The extended forecast has increased rain chances from Friday through the middle of next week with the possibility scattered showers and thunderstorms, but the confidence remains low in the forecast for the Memorial Day Weekend. The NWS 7 Day Quantitative Precipitation Forecast (QPF) shows the majority of the Brazos River Watershed receiving less than 0.5 inches over the next 7 days.

Reservoir Status

Weekend Severe Weather

The NWS has issued a Flash Flood Watch from this evening through Saturday evening. According to the forecast, a slow moving upper low pressure system should move through the region with the potential of producing widespread heavy rainfall. The most severe areas, which includes parts of Fort Bend County, could potentially receive between 3 to 4 inches of rain with isolated amounts exceeding 6 inches over the next 24 hours with rainfall intensities between 1 to 3 inches per hour. The lower Brazos River watershed from Waco to Freeport could receive widespread rainfall amounts between 2 to 3 inches.

From Jeff Lindner with the Harris County Flood Control District:

A strong storm system will move across SE TX on Saturday with a complex of thunderstorms likely to develop and move slowly across SE TX. Parameters will be in place for heavy to excessive rainfall as this complex of storms crosses the area. Deep tropical moisture combined with a diffluent upper air patter aloft, and warm rainfall processes all point to excessive short term rainfall rates of 1-3 inches per hour. Line of storms may slow as it near and moves south of the I-10 corridor Saturday afternoon and this would only increase the flash flooding threat.

Rainfall amounts on Saturday will average 1-3 inches with isolated totals of 6 inches or more. Much of this rainfall will fall in a short period of time maximizing run-off potential. While grounds are not particularly wet, the potential for intense rainfall rates will likely produce a high street flooding threat. Rises on area creeks and bayou will also be possible. Most creeks and bayous will be able to handle the 1-3 inches, but if the 6 inch isolated totals fall over certain watersheds, then some flooding would be possible.

Based on the current forecasts, the latest WGRFC data shows the potential for a Minor to Moderate river event occurring within the Brazos/Navasota Watershed. This is only a forecasted potential scenario and not an immediate flood threat from the Brazos River. The extents and specific location(s) will depend on the final rainfall amounts received. The WGRFC latest forecast shows the Brazos River in Richmond rising to at least Gage Elevation 18.2 feet, but could enter Action Stage toward the end of the week. We will continue to watch this system and the conditions throughout the weekend.

The immediate threat from this event is the possibility of flash flooding within streets and our smaller drainage systems. Our major channels could experience rapid rises leading to flooding along those streams; however, the impacts to larger facilities and the Brazos River will vary depending on the actual rainfall amounts and intensities. We encourage everyone to follow good flood safety standards and stay informed through trusted sources such as the National Weather Service, Harris County Flood Control, and the Fort Bend County Office of Homeland Security & Emergency Management.

Weekly Brazos River Outlook

The Brazos River in Richmond is currently at Gage Elevation 13.01 and falling. Based on the 7-day extended forecast, no flooding along the Brazos River through Fort Bend County is anticipated.

This Week

The beginning of the week should consist of sunny to partly cloudy skies with highs in the mid to upper 80s and lows in the low 70s. Our rain chances remain low throughout the majority of the week with our highest chances for rain on Thursday and Friday (20% to 40%). The extended forecast does show some additional rainfall over the weekend into the beginning of next week; however, the confidence in the extended forecast remains low. The current Quantitative Precipitation Forecast (QPF) shows the upper portions of the Brazos River, upstream of Hempstead, receiving 1.5 to 3 inches of rain with the lower portions, including Fort Bend County, receiving less than 1 to 1.5 inches of rain over the next 7 days.

Reservoir Status

Weekly Brazos River Outlook

The Brazos River in Richmond is currently at Gage Elevation 16.48 and falling. Based on the 7-day extended forecast, no flooding along the Brazos River through Fort Bend County is anticipated.

This Week

This week’s forecast includes mostly sunny to partly cloudy skies with highs in the mid to upper 80s. We are expecting a couple of cold fronts to push through the region on Tuesday and Friday night. Ultimately these fronts could lead to a clear and cooler weekend. With the passing fronts, our rain chances are increased on Tuesday and Friday into Saturday morning. The current Quantitative Precipitation Forecast (QPF) shows the upper portions of the Brazos River, upstream of Hempstead, receiving less than 3/4 inch of rain with the lower portions, including Fort Bend County, receiving less than ½ inch of rain over the next 7 days. The confidence in the extended forecast for the end of the week is low so final rainfall amounts through Saturday will vary.

Reservoir Status

Hurricane Preparedness Week (May 3 through May 9)

This week is Hurricane Preparedness Week. Although our flood risk is just as elevated outside of Hurricane Season, this week is a good reminder on how we should prepare for one of our most dangerous natural disasters. Regardless of the seasonal predictions, it only takes one storm to change your life and community. Tropical cyclones are among nature’s most powerful and destructive phenomena. If you live in an area prone to tropical cyclones, you need to be prepared. Learn how during Hurricane Preparedness Week (May 3-9, 2020) by visiting hurricanes.gov/prepare.

Temporary Shut Down of Regional Surface Water Treatment Plant

As you may be aware, residents in Colony Lakes and Pebble Creek are provided with water from the City of Missouri City’s (“City”) surface water plant. As part of the City’s planned expansion of the water plant to double the water supply capacity, the City has notified the District serving these communities that a planned shut-down of the City’s water plant will take place from May 4 through May 7, 2020, to prepare the site for future construction. The shutdown impact area is depicted in the map included in this notice. During this temporary shut-down, the District will utilize groundwater wells to provide adequate water supplies to its residents.

At this time, the District does not anticipate any issues regarding water quality or disruption of service. However, the City has notified the District that based on previous experience, some residents may detect subtle changes in the taste or odor of water when this switch is made. The City and the District monitor and test water quality daily to ensure that water being delivered to residents meets all applicable standards related to drinking water.

If you have any concerns regarding your water, please contact the District’s operator at 832-490-1600.

SWTP Shutdown Impact Area

How to Prevent Stormwater Pollution

What is stormwater?

Stormwater is water from rain or melting snow that does not soak into the ground. It flows from rooftops, over paved areas, bare soil, and sloped lawns. As it flows, stormwater runoff collects and transports soil, animal waste, salt, pesticides, fertilizers, oil and grease, debris and other potential pollutants.

What is the problem?

Rain and snowmelt wash pollutants from streets, construction sites, and land into storm sewers and ditches. Eventually, the storm sewers and ditches empty the polluted stormwater directly into streams and rivers without prior purification or treatment. This is stormwater pollution.

Polluted stormwater degrades our lakes, rivers, wetlands and other waterways. Nutrients such as phosphorous and nitrogen can cause the overgrowth of algae, resulting in oxygen depletion in waterways. Toxic substances from motor vehicles and careless application of pesticides and fertilizers threaten water quality and can kill fish and other aquatic life. Bacteria from animal wastes and improper connections to storm sewer systems can make lakes and waterways unsafe for wading, swimming and fish consumption. Eroded soil is a pollutant as well. It clouds the waterway and interferes with the habitat of fish and plant life.

Tips to Prevent Stormwater Pollution

  • Cover and contain topsoil and mulch during installation.
  • Pick up animal waste.
  • Reconsider using toxic asphalt sealers, seal cracks only.
  • Do not drain swimming pools into storm drains or road ditches.
  • Reduce winter salt application.
  • Compost or mulch leaves and yard debris rather than hauling to dumps.
  • Dispose of automotive fluids appropriately.
  • Remove litter from streets, sidewalks, and stormgates adjacent to your property.
  • Sweep litter and debris from driveways and parking lots rather than hosing debris into storm drains.
  • Water the lawn, not the sidewalk and driveway.
  • Reduce paved surfaces.
  • Triple rinse and recycle empty pesticide and fertilizer containers.
  • Avoid using chemicals near waterways or storm drains.
  • Clean up spills immediately and properly dispose of cleanup materials.
  • Avoid spraying pesticides/fertilizers in windy conditions or when rain is in the forecast.
  • Fill pesticide/fertilizer tanks on a gravel surface, away from storm drains, sewers or ditches.

Call to Action from Commissioner DeMerchant – Property Tax Relief

Dear Fort Bend County Precinct 4 Residents,

This past week most of us received our 2020 Notice of Appraised Value with increases in our taxable property values. This came at a time when most of us have anxiety and fear regarding our job security, paying our mortgages, and other expenses. The increased property tax burden resulting from the surge in property valuations will harshly affect and compound our hardships.

Many of you have contacted me regarding your increased valuations. I immediately contacted Fort Bend County’s Appraisal District to provide instant relief to our residents. Even though they were very sympathetic to the current situation, this requires our State Legislators, Attorney General, and Governor to make an exemption. In addition to my letter to Governor Abbott, Attorney General Paxton, and our State Representatives and Senators, I am calling on you to reach out to our State officials respectfully requesting and strongly urging the following:

  • Roll back the 2020 valuations to the 2019 valuations
  • Create payment plans without fees
  • Reduce late fees
  • Extend deadlines
  • Change payment due dates

To make it easier, I have provided their information below as well as link – https://www.texastribune.org/directory/#txhouse

Thank you. I hope you and yours stay healthy. Together we will make a difference.


SAMPLE LETTER / EMAIL

Dear Governor, Attorney General, State Senators and State Representatives,

For most of us, our homes are the most expensive item we will ever purchase. A home is more than a residence. It is a family dwelling place, shelter, and refuge from the outside world. I recently received my 2020 property valuation and was shocked with increase in taxable values. This increase comes at time when job security, paying home mortgages, and other expenses weigh very heavily on my family.

The disastrous situation brought on by the COVID-19 pandemic, downturn in the economy at all levels, and the alarmingly ill-timed record-high property tax appraisal valuations collectively pose a danger to my health, welfare, and safety. I respectfully request and strongly urge all state governmental officials, representatives, senators, and directors of the Fort Bend County Appraisal District in taking immediate action with the following:

  • Roll back the 2020 valuations to the 2019 valuations
  • Create payment plans without fees
  • Lower late fees
  • Extend deadlines
  • Change payment due dates.

Thank you.


SAMPLE PHONE CONVERSATION / MESSAGE

Hello, My name is ____________, I am a Fort Bend County resident. The reason why I am calling you is for you to take immediate action regarding property tax relief and on the following:

  • Roll back the 2020 valuations to the 2019 valuations
  • Create payment plans without fees
  • Lower late fees
  • Extend deadlines
  • Change payment due dates.

The disastrous situation brought on by the COVID-19 pandemic, downturn in the economy, and record-high property tax appraisal valuations collectively pose a danger to my health, welfare, and safety. Thank you.


Office of the Governor Greg Abbott

P.O. Box 12428
Austin Texas 78711
(512) 463-2000
https://gov.texas.gov/contact

Office of the Attorney General Ken Paxton

PO Box 12548
Austin, TX 78711-2548
800-252-8011
https://www.texasattorneygeneral.gov/contact-us-online-form

Office of State Representative Rick Miller – District 26

Room E1.304
P.O. Box 2910
Austin, TX 78768
(512) 463-0710
Rick.miller@house.texas.gov

Office of State Senator Borris Miles – District 13

P.O. Box 12068
Capitol Station
Austin, TX 78711
(512) 463-0113
borris.miles@senate.texas.gov

Office of State Representative Ron Reynolds – District 27

Room E1.320
P.O. Box 2910
Austin, TX 78768
(512) 463-0494
ron.reynolds@house.texas.gov

Office of State Senator Joan Huffman – District 17

P.O. Box 12068
Capitol Station
Austin, TX 78711
(512) 463-0117
Joan.Huffman@senate.texas.gov

Office of State Representative Gary Gates – District 28

Room CAP GW.11
P.O. Box 2910
Austin, TX 78768
(512) 463-0657
gary.gates@house.texas.gov

Office of State Senator Lois Kolkhorst – District 18

P.O. Box 12068
Capitol Station
Austin, TX 78711
(512) 463-0118
Lois.Kolkhorst@senate.texas.gov

Office of State Representative Phil Stephenson – District 85

Room E2.902
P.O. Box 2910
Austin, TX 78768
(512) 463-0604
Phil.Stephenson@house.texas.gov

Emergency Preparedness

Fort Bend County has experienced destructive high water events in the recent years. We must be prepared not only during Hurricane Season but all year round.

With this in mind, Fort Bend County Commissioner Ken R. DeMerchant would like to share some important Emergency Preparedness tips with our residents.